Archive for the ‘Unions’ Category

Peoples’ Movement Assembly(PMA) 2012 Program

Friday, October 19th, 2012

Paper copies  available at Lecture Hall 1 this evening and at  PMA

This evening = 6-9pm Michael Parenti event (Lecture Hall 1).

 

PEOPLES’ MOVEMENT ASSEMBLY October 19-20, 2012

Monday, October 15th, 2012
PEOPLES’ MOVEMENT ASSEMBLY
AT THE EVERGREEN STATE COLLEGE
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2012, 7PM, TALK BY MICHAEL PARENTI
“ECOLOGY WARS AND THE 1% PATHOLOGY”
LECTURE HALL 1-TESC
 
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012
WORKSHOPS AND CONVERSATIONS
VARIOUS LOCATIONS– LECTURE HALL 1 AND SEMINAR 2 BUILDING-TESC
PARENTS—>FREE CHILD CARE  all SATURDAY in SEMINAR II:  D3105

Several TESC programs and the Olympia Movement for Justice and Peace (OMJP) are pleased to announce that this important event that will be held at The Evergreen State College on Friday, October 19th and Saturday, October 20th.

The Peoples’ Movement Assembly will bring together activists and scholars from the region to discuss not only what are some of the major social, economic, and human rights issues that we face, but also what can be done about them and what some people are actually doing now.

 

The program starts on Friday evening, October 19 at 7PM at Lecture Hall # 1 with a talk and discussion by Michael Parenti.  His website notes:

 

“Michael Parenti is an internationally known award-winning author and lecturer. He is one of the nation’s leading progressive political analysts. His highly informative and entertaining books and talks have reached a wide range of audiences in North America and abroad.”

A few comments on his work:

 ”Michael Parenti is a towering prophetic voice in American life. We need him now more than ever.”  — Cornel West

“Parenti offers a valuable rebuttal to the drumbeat…from the right.”  — New York Times Book Review
This event is FREE and open to the public, especially the Evergreen community and the larger Olympia community.  For more information on Dr. Parenti see his website at http://www.michaelparenti.org/.
On Saturday, October 20, from 10AM-6PM, there will be a series of plenary discussions and many workshops that will cover a variety of issues such as the environment, prisoners, the economic crisis, Bringing our Billions Home, food security, the occupy movement, organizing, nuclear weapons, movement building, veterans, new methods of war, gender issues, healthcare, corporate personhood, Palestine, alternative media, Venezuela today, police accountability, and many other workshops.
A more detailed schedule is below.
On Saturday we will begin with an opening panel at 10AM on local, national, and international issues.  There will be three sets of workshops of about 90 minutes each that will begin at 11:30, 2PM, and 3:45 PM, and a closing plenary at 5:30 PM.
All are invited for all or any part of the program.  A more detailed program is below and a printed program will be available on the day of the event at Lecture Hall 1 and the Seminar 2 building.

 

Please tell all of those in the Evergreen community, especially students and also those in the greater community.
TESC programs that are helping to sponsor this event are Power in American Society, Gateways, Political Economy and Social Movements, Making Effective Change, and the Dean’s fund and the President’s Diversity Fund.
Community Groups who have help greatly are the Olympia Movement for Justice and Peace and the Fellowship of Reconciliation.  For more information contact mosqueda@evergreen.edu or 360-867-6513.

Peoples’ Movement Assembly Schedule                 

@The Evergreen State College

October 19 and 20, 2012

Lecture Hall 1 and Seminar 2 Buildings

Schedule of Events                                                  (as of 10/14/12, subject to change)

 

Friday, October 19, 2012

 

Michael Parenti, “Ecology Wars and the 1% Pathology”-7PM-Lecture Hall 1

*******************************************************************************

 

 

Saturday, October 20, 2012

 

Gary Galbreath, Lecture Hall 1, 10AM, Welcome and Opening Prayer Song

 

Opening Panel, 10:15-11:15AM “State of the Struggle”

International –Michael Parenti

National- Savvina Chowdury

Local- Sarah Regan

 

First Set of Workshops 11:30AM-12:50PM

 

Lecture Hall 1, Gar Lipow and…, “Environmental Justice”

 

Seminar 2 Buildings

A2105- Tyler Henderson, Socialist Alternative, “What Caused the Financial Crisis and Why Capitalism Can’t Fix It”

E3107- Sidwalk (invited), “Foreclosure Resistance”

E3109- Gateways (Naomi Tachman-Kaplan and Miguel Rodriguez) and Jericho Project, “Prisons and Prisoners”

A2109- Glen Anderson, OlyFOR-“Bring Our Billions Home”

E3105- Steve Niva, TESC faculty and Tim Russell, Sociology Teacher, ”America’s New Way of War: From Drones to Special Operations”

D2107- Sarah LaGrange and Patricia Ridge, POWER, “Women’s Issues in State and National Politics”

D3107- Mary Hath Spokane, “Occupy Movement”

A3105- “Youth in the Movement”, unconfirmed moderator at this time

E3107- Peter Bohmer, “Current Economic Crisis: US and Globally

C3109- Activist Media Showcase

 

Lecture Hall 1-Brown Bag Lunch Hour with Dr. Jill Stein, Green Party Candidate for President of the U.S. at 1PM-2PM 

(Bring your own lunch, buy it on campus or partake in some limited snacks that will be provided.)

 

Second Set of Workshops 2:10-3:30PM

 

Lecture Hall 1- Alice Zillah, Leonard Eiger, “Abolish Nuclear Weapons”

 

Seminar 2, Buildings

A2105- Gar Lipow, “Cooling A Fevered Planet”

E3107- Glen Anderson, OlyFOR, “Empowering the Progressive Movement”

E3109- Skye @ Left Foot, Kim Chaplin, Pat Rasmussen, “Food Security”

A2109- Josh Simpson, IVAW, “Operation Recovery and Veterans Rights”

E3105- “Gender Justice”, unconfirmed moderator at this time

D2107- “Combating Racism,” unconfirmed moderator at this time

D3107- Teresa Mosqueda, Washington State Labor Council, “Healthcare Rights”

A3105- Molly Gibbs, MovetoAmendOlympia.org, “Corporate Personhood”

A3107- Jen Kaplan, Seattle Attorney, “Know Your Legal Rights”

C3109- Activist Media Showcase

 

Third  Set of Workshops, 3:45-5:15

 

Lecture Hall 1, Jill Stein and Kshama Sawant, “Alternative Politics”

 

Seminar 2 Buildings

A2105- TESC Divest, BDS/Palestine

E3109- Kelly Norman, Student Debt

A2109- Brendan Funtek (OMJP), Rick Fellows (Media Island), Deborah Vinsel, (TCTV), “Alternative Media”

E3105, Oscar The Wild,  “Anarchists Anonymous”

D2107- Returned Students from Venezuela, “Venezuela Today”

D3107- “Marriage Equality”

A3105- Mike Coday (OMJP) and Drew Hendricks (Copwatch), “Police Accountability”

A3107- Harry Branch, Susan Macomson, Laura Henderson, “Shoreline Protection”

E3107 – Stephanie Gottschalk from CIELO & Nellie Sollis, “Immigration”

C3109- Activist Media Showcase

 

Wrap Up and Summary at Lecture Hall 1, 5:30-6:15

Facilitators: Marylea Coday and Mary Hath Spokane, “Organizing opportunities, announcements and where do we go from here.”

 

N.B. The final schedule will be available at the FREE conference.

 

Please send this announcement to others especially any lists that you belong to and to Facebook pages and other social media.

 

PMA on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/events/428624080488725/

Paper copies  available at Lecture Hall 1 this evening and at  PMA

This evening = 6-9pm Michael Parenti event (Lecture Hall 1).

 

Austin’s Picks: Happy Labor Day to the Working Clas

Monday, September 3rd, 2012

 

From Recomposition

“Just and peaceful labor relations”: Why the U.S. government supported collective bargaining

| Filed under Our writings

 

This post gives a brief account of some of the history of the capitalist state’s sponsorship of contracts for unions in the United States, with an emphasis on the reasoning that politicians and judges gave for their support of collective bargaining. The piece argues that what the U.S. government wanted out of introducing state support for collective bargaining was, in the words of the National Labor Relations Act, to ‘Promote the flow of commerce’ through ‘friendly adjustment of industrial disputes.’ 

“Just and peaceful labor relations”: Why the U.S. government supported collective bargaining
by Nate Hawthorne

The U.S. government increasingly promoted collective bargaining in the early part of the 20th century. To take one important example: In 1919, economically disruptive disputes escalated between the International Ladies Garment Workers Union (ILGWU) and capitalists in the textile industry. In response, the New York governor appointed a state commission aimed at preventing “industrial war” which created “distrust and hostility” between classes. This commission recommended collective bargaining in order to reconcile the union and the employers. As the commission wrote, a “collective bargaining agreement calls for the utmost good faith on both sides to perform (…) every term and condition thereof; whether it refers to shop strikes on the part of the worker, lock-outs on the part of the employers, or the maintenance of its terms as to wages and hours. This Board desires to emphasize this point as fundamental in any contractual relationship.” Contracts require such good faith and, from the point of view of the capitalist state, contracts helped create such good faith.

With state help, the ILGWU won an industry-wide collective bargaining agreement, which the industry association soon violated in 1921. The ILGWU sued and won an injunction against the employers. The New York Supreme Court said it issued this injunction to prevent “the continuance of an industrial impasse.” The Court said that no matter who won the dispute, “such industrial struggles lead to lockouts, strikes and acts of violence” and in the end “the employer and employee, instead of co-operating to promote the success of the industry, become permanently divided into hostile groups, each resentful and suspicious of the other.” Therefore, “it is the duty of the court to (…) compel both parties to await an orderly judicial determination of the controversy.” In other words, the capitalist state began to believe that promoting collective bargaining agreements would help create industrial peace. The role of law is not simply to protect individual capitalists but to bring greater stability to the capitalist system as a whole. (On this point, I encourage fellow workers to read the discussion of the English Factory Acts in chapter 10 of Karl Marx’s “Capital.”)

The state’s role and strategy of promoting stability in the capitalist system by promoting collective bargaining explains U.S. labor legislation created in the 1930s. The 1933 National Industrial Recovery Act (hereafter, “Recovery Act”) said “disorganization of industry (…) burdens interstate and foreign commerce, affects the public welfare, and undermines the standards of living of the American people.” The Act argued that one key tool for more efficiently organizing industry under capitalism was to promote collective bargaining agreements. Thus Congress should “remove obstructions to the free flow of interstate and foreign commerce” by “induc[ing] and maintain[ing] united action of labor and management under adequate governmental sanctions and supervision.” The Recovery Act added that contracts would raise wages for workers, “increas[ing] the consumption of industrial and agricultural products by increasing purchasing power” of workers. More money in the pockets of more workers would help stabilize the American economy by providing a larger base of consumers.

Read the whole article at Recomposition?  Hey, you have a day off, take a minute to read and think about labor.

Austin’s Picks: Is Class Struggle Anarchism?

Saturday, August 25th, 2012

Austin K sent this link along in an email this morning. It’s a couple of years old, but it’s still worth sharing and reading. The links go to interesting websites if you have an open mind about politics, which is to say, that you can imagine or entertain valid political positions that are broader than the republican and democratic party talking points. I am only posting two of the points that Nate pulls from Tom’s article. Nate uses his What in the Hell …? website the way I use smallblueplanet.org as a staging area to gather ideas, to store links and info, then to compose from that website for publication elsewhere. For me, that makes Nate’s What in the Hell… ? particularly interesting.

What in the Hell is Class Struggle Anarchism?

July 24, 2009

Austust another WordPress.com siteIt’s

Hat tip to Tom Wetzel for this fine article. Check it out. Full disclosure and a little bragging, I know Tom, we’re both involved in the Workers Solidarity Alliance, so I’m biased. Anyhow, read his piece.

My favorite three bits are quoted below. With these bits I was reading it and I was like “yeah, this is what I try to do in this kind
of work but I haven’t put it this clearly before,” which is a cool feeling, like the article put clearly into words what had been more of a gut feeling for me or stuff I’d fumbled and put badly before.

1. “Dual organizational anarchists often say that the role of the anarchist political organization is to “win the battle of ideas,” that
is, to gain influence within movements and among the mass of the population by countering authoritarian or liberal or conservative ideas. Bakunin had said that the role of anarchist activists was a “leadership of ideas.”

But disseminating ideas isn’t the only form of influence. Working with others of diverse views in mass organizations and struggles, exhibiting a genuine commitment, and being a personable and supportive person in this context also builds personal connections, and makes it more likely one’s ideas will be taken seriously.”

2. “mass struggles and mass organizing as the process for changing society…because it is through the active participation of growing numbers of ordinary people, building and controlling their own movements, that they develop the capacity and aspirations for changing society.

From the point of view of “organized anarchism with a class struggle perspective,” two kinds of organization are needed: (1) forms of mass organization through which ordinary people can grow and develop their collective strength, and (2) political organizations of the anarchist or libertarian socialist minority, to have a more effective means to coordinate our activities, gain influence in working class communities, and disseminate our ideas. In the World War 1 era Italian anarchists coined the term “dual organization” for this perspective.

Read the whole piece if you have a couple of minutes.

Austin’s Picks: Autonomy Alliance

Friday, August 24th, 2012

“It’s a scary time to be involved with radical class struggle. But was it ever any other way?”

Austin Kelly suggests you scan this one from LibCom.org:

 

 

Autonomy Alliance: The interview

 

 

An interview conducted with two members of St Louis libertarian group, Autonomy Alliance.

While in St. Louis, I was lucky enough to stay with two members of the Autonomy Alliance. In that time, I’ve been impressed with the level activity I’ve seen from the group—regular publications, public events (not the least of which included a screening of the 1971 film Sacco and Vanzetti), and running a once-yearly weekend school.

Unlike many of the city-based libertarian groups in the US, I hadn’t heard of them before. So I thought it’d be worth learning a bit more about them. The following interview took place with those same two members, although it’s in personal capacity, so should not be taken as the official AA positions.

Tell me a bit about the group. When were you founded? How many people are currently active? Are members active in any other organizations? What are the particular politics of your group and what level of political agreement do you strive for? What are the activities and projects you’re involved in?

Autonomy Alliance has been active for about 5 years, although it’s current core group has only been active since late 2008. There are about 10 members who attend regular meetings, vote on event proposals, and facilitate annual events. Our members are all involved with other local and national anti-capitalist organizations. AA is made up of PARECONists, social anarchists, radical feminists, and Wobblies. The goal has always been to bring together folks of different radical left-wing backgrounds into a cohesive organization to work on local projects, distribute literature, discuss readings and put out a quarterly newsletter.

One aspect of AA that differs from many radical groups is that we have defined membership, a democratic voting procedure, and agreed upon organizational by-laws which we collectively edit every year or so. While AA is still small in numbers, I think we’re able to focus our time and energy into local projects in a way that’s relatively efficient. I think we all want to avoid the pitfalls that come along with doing things in a disjointed and loosely organized way. We co-sponsor an annual event called Left Wing School, a day long series of workshops and panel discussions on a wide ranging number of subjects, from labor, environmentalism, feminism, Palestine solidarity, etc. The LWS has occurred every December for the past several years. In the past, we’ve also co-sponsored several commemorations of the 1877 General Strike. In 2010, we brought in famous labor historian, Jeremy Brecher, along with popular singer-songwriter David Rovics to participate in this event. It was attended by about 100 people.

Read the whole thing? or turn on Good Morning, America? You make the call.

Winning the War on Position

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012

Austin Kelly sent along this link.

Winning the War of Position

August 19, 2012

| Filed under For discussion


This article makes a number of arguments about the direction the IWW should take in its organizing, including taking a longer-term perspective than the next few years.

Winning the War of Position: Working-Class Hegemony and Class Unionism
by B.C.

It is readily apparent to any working-class person that the economic oppressions of capitalist society, numerous though they may be, are only one facet of the system of social control exercised by bourgeois society. The dominant culture is one of homogenous individualism, materialism, and intellectual vapidity. It is not a culture natural to a free and free-thinking people; but rather a culture designed to maintain the integrity of an unjust social order, designed to favor an exploiting class over a mass of oppressed working people – using each and every tool, political and ideological, that it can exploit in its battle for continued dominance.

Read the whole article?

Oh yeah, a republican congressman said something stupid about birth control and a lot of the media thought that was news. It may be an entertaining story and it’s always fun to see a politician twist in the wind, but I don’t think it’s news that right-wingers are ignorant on topics of science, biology, conception etc. It is kind of ironic that this particular ignorant republican congressman sits on the House Science, Space and Technology Committee. But hey, he sits there, drawing a salary, nobody claims he brings anything to the table.

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