Archive for October, 2012

CLIMATE ACTION GROUP November 13, 2012 Olympia Center

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

The climate crisis is upon us – and it will get worse.

Now is the time for people to organize from the grassroots up!

The Olympia Fellowship of Reconciliation invites you to join our new climate action group.

The first meeting will occur in two weeks – on Tuesday November 13.  (See below)

 

Confronting The Climate Crisis

The climate crisis is the overriding issue

  • of our times

The new Olympia FOR climate action group will work on a wide range of climate issues, including the coal train comments and hearings, 350.0rg’s divestment campaign, and maintaining constant pressure on our representatives. We will also be out on the streets with creative non-violent actions demanding an immediate massive economic push – comparable to World War II – to transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy.

First meeting: Tuesday, November 13, 2012, 7:00-9:00 PM

Olympia Center, Room 205

We will be showing the new documentary film,

Coal Crossroads

Join us!!

Drone Wars? Good Idea?

Sunday, October 28th, 2012

I guess we can try to get the word out.

Grand Jury Resisters Need Your Support

Saturday, October 27th, 2012

Friends are in jail. We don’t know how long they will be there. We don’t what criminal activity is being investigated that leads to these folks being jailed for refusing to answer Grand Jury questions.

Land of the Free. Home of the Brave.

Jump in, you can help. We are the ones we have been waiting for.

Committee Against Political Repression

Skip to content

Compilation Album Created in Support of Grand Jury Resisters

Posted on October 26, 2012 | 2 Comments

Musical Impressions has created a compilation album called “Black Clothing, Anarchist Literature, Flags, Flag-Making Materials, Cell Phones, Address Books, & Hard Drives” in support of the Grand Jury Resisters.

You can buy it here. Proceeds go to support the legal and material needs of those resisting the FBI investigations of anarchists in the Pacific Northwest.

Western Washington Fellowship of Reconciliation: November 10, 2012 Retreat

Saturday, October 27th, 2012

We See a Train a’Coming: The Climate Crisis, the Coal Train & Beyond

The Western Washington Fellowship of Reconciliation’s (WWFOR) Fall Retreat is for everyone who cares about the climate crisis, environmental justice, and jobs, in the context of the dangers of moving millions of tons of dirty coal through our communities. This is for everyone who supports a better energy future and grassroots democracy.

People in the Puget Sound and along the Pacific coast are organizing vigorous campaigns to stop this. Western Washington FOR’s 2012 Fall Retreat will inform and activate us.

Giant coal companies are pushing their plans to extract massive quantities of coal from Montana and Wyoming and ship it on exposed rail cars to West Coast ports, spewing dangerous coal dust all along the way.They want Washington’s and Oregon’s ports to export if to China and other countries that will burn it, seriously polluting the world’s air, and hurt our climate.

$15 conference fee (or what you are able to pay). Bring your own lunch. Check out the registration form at www.wwfor.org

Austin’s Picks: Queer Marxist Feminism

Saturday, October 27th, 2012

http://propelledbyfire.wordpress.com/2011/01/24/i-am/

i am…

Image

i am the seven-year old girl wrapped tightly in her covers as she hears the drunken stumble of her father’s footsteps just before he opens the door to her room

i am the mother of four standing all day in the seemingly endless welfare line just so her babies can eat

i am the recently laid off sister waiting nine hours in the hospital for a five-minute doctor visit

i am the seventeen year old girl crying alone, bracing herself for the makeshift abortion in the dingy apartments behind the McDonald’s

i am the seventy year old womyn daydreaming of how retirement would feel as her arthritic hands fold the rich kids laundry

i am the sex worker walking the street in order to survive

i am the warrior raising her fist and organizing against the system

i am the wife in prison for poisoning her husband because that night was the last time he was ever going to touch her

i am the girlfriend infected with HIV because she didn’t know her man was creepin or closeted

i am the fourteen year old who tried to hang herself because she couldn’t stand the pain of remembering

i am the tranny constantly having to validate herself as a “real” womyn

i am the little girl who died from a cold because her mother didn’t have insurance and couldn’t afford medicine

i am the two womyn whose love is either fetishized or condemned

i am the zoned-out junky in the alleyway, pookie-pipe in hand, because life threw her too many curve balls

i am the raped whom no one believes because he was a “friend” so she must have wanted it

i am

i am

i am

sister, i am you…just as you are me

womyn sharing the same beat

soulfully connected

hit by the same struggle

and yearning for the same liberation

*
Image
*
The ability to labor resides only in a human being, whose life is consumed in the process of producing. First it must be nine months in the womb; must be fed, clothed, and trained; then when it works its bed must be made; its floor is swept, its lunchbox prepared; its sexuality not gratified but quietened; its dinner ready when it gets home, even if this is eight in the morning from the night shift. This is how labor power is produced and reproduced when it is daily consumed in the factory or office. To describe its basic production and reproduction is to describe women’s Work.

–Selma James, “The Power of Women and the Subversion of the Community” (1972)

*


*
“I must remind you that starving a child is violence. Suppressing a culture is violence. Neglecting school children is violence. Punishing a mother and her family is violence. Discrimination against a working man is violence. Ghetto housing is violence. Ignoring medical need is violence. Contempt for poverty is violence.”

— Coretta Scott King

*Image*

Scott Crow in Olympia for a few speaking events

Thursday, October 25th, 2012

Activist, anarchist, writer, organizer – Scott Crow – is going to be in Olympia for a few speaking engagements over the next few days. He will be at South Puget Sound Community College on Oct 25th at noon, Room 102, Building 26

Then he will be at Last Word Books on Friday, Oct 26th at 7:30 pm. and one more time in Oly on Monday, Oct 29th at Lecture Hall 2, The Evergreen State College at noon.

Want to understand anarchism? Learn more about it. It’s not what you may think.

Want to continue to misunderstand and misrepresent anarchism? As Bobby Dylan said, “you are going to have to serve somebody…” Choose today, who will you serve? You are going to have to serve somebody.

Black Flags and Radical Relief Efforts in New Orleans: An Interview with scott crow

Author and activist scott crow

“Solidarity not Charity” is a way of feeding people while addressing the underlying problems that cause hunger. The way this manifested itself in Common Ground was to immediately deliver and render aid where the state had failed, and then to leave structures in place so communities can continue to rebuild themselves as they see fit.”

Interview by Stevie Peace & Kevin Van Meter

In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina both federal and local authorities failed the population of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast region. As a result, relief efforts from various sectors of American society flowed south. One of the first and most spectacular and aggressive efforts was Common Ground Relief — formed by strands of the anti-globalization and anarchist movements. scott crow documents these struggles in “Black Flags and Windmills: Hope, Anarchy, and the Common Ground Collective”, recently released by PM Press. In this interview, Crow describes the process of becoming an author after being an organizer, reviews the history and myths of Common Ground and explores possible lessons for future progressive and radical organizing. Visit crow’s website at http://scottcrow.org/.

Can you speak to the writing process behind “Black Flags and Windmillsand your shift from an organizer to an author?

One word: difficult. I don’t consider myself a writer; and while I have written a few pieces over the years, it has mostly been out of necessity. From my arrival in New Orleans I took copious notes. Every time I would get moments to get away, I would take notes about organizing and creating an organization to deal with the disaster following Hurricane Katrina. Additionally, I wrote communiqués from just days after the storm and continued for three years. I went back to all of those writings and began turning them into chapters. On a personal level it was healing to write: I came back with post-traumatic stress, couldn’t function in society and felt like the ghost in the machine a lot. The writing actually helped me to relive those traumas in a different way, to really dissect them. It was almost a five-year process; I feel so much better now than I did when I started the book. This is not to say that “Black Flags and Windmills” is a sorrow-filled book. There are lots of beautiful stories along the way and lots of really engaging organizing that was going on. The book describes the anarchist heyday of Common Ground, when the most self-identified anarchists came; this was early September 2005 until 2008. Afterward, the organization became much more structured in a traditional nonprofit way. This is not to denigrate it — just to say that the book focuses on this initial period of “black flags” at Common Ground.

Since memory is a tricky thing, I did outside research and revisited with people. I went back to news articles from grassroots media, reports and blogs to look at specific events and the way things unfolded. Then, I would ask key organizers and New Orleans residents, “Do you remember when this thing happened?” Sometimes it was completely different from how I remembered it. I don’t claim to speak for Common Ground, as I think that would do a disservice to the thousands of people who participated and the hundreds of key organizers that were there.

When I tell a story I want people to understand it and create common bonds. I wrote this book for people who might not have any understanding about radical or anarchist concepts. I always ask myself, “What would my mom think about this?” While I wrote it for people like her, my target audience was those who were coming into movements and might be inspired by what Common Ground was building. I used the stories in the book to give a primer on the theoretical background of anarchism in practice. Another part of the book is telling my own personal narrative. It’s not because I think my story is important, but I wanted to show that I am a regular person that was just caught up in extraordinary circumstances.

Want to know more? Read the whole piece. Come sit in on one of the events.

5th ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CHE GUEVARA CONFERENCE November 2-4, 2012

Wednesday, October 24th, 2012

5th ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CHE GUEVARA CONFERENCE – CANADA
“Cuba’s Economic Reforms: Capitalism or Socialism”
Featuring:
DR. ALEIDA GUEVARA – Havana, Cuba
Cuban revolutionary leader, a pediatrician, prominent writer, author of the book, “Chavez, Venezuela and the New Latin America” and daughter of the legendary Ernesto Che Guevara.
4 DAYS OF CONFERENCE – FREE ENTRANCE:
((1)) FRIDAY NOVEMBER 2
DAY 1 Special Evening for the 5 Cuban Heroes
7pm
MT. PLEASANT NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE
800 East Broadway (1 Block East of Broadway and Fraser)
Vancouver, BC, Canada
((2)) SATURDAY NOVEMBER 3 & SUNDAY NOVEMBER 4
DAY 2 & DAY 3 Two Full Days of Workshops
10am-6pm
RUSSIAN HALL
600 Campbell Ave.
Vancouver, BC, Canada
((3)) MONDAY NOVEMBER 5
DAY 4 of the Conference
5pm-9pm
Thompson Rivers University
900 McGill Road
Kamloops, BC, Canada
Register now, it’s free!
http://vancouverinternationalcheconference.blogspot.ca/2011/10/register-now.html
On Friday November 2, 2012 Vancouver will host a special evening in tribute of the 5 Cuban heroes held in US jails to open the 4 day of Che Guevara International Conference. Saturday and Sunday November 3 & 4 will feature two full days in Vancouver with many workshops to provide enough time for discourse, debate, argument, polemics and politics! Then we will take the Che Conference over 350 kilometers to the east to Kamloops, BC for 2 highly anticipated workshops on the evening of Monday November 5.
The Vancouver International Che Guevara Conference began in 2008 in honour of Che’s 80th birthday. Each conference has held a unique theme, the first conference “Che Guevara: Thinker & Fighter – Are His Ideas Relevant for the 21st Century?”; 2009 conference “50 years of Dynamism of the Cuban Revolution”; 2010 conference “Cuba & Revolutionary Internationalism“ and 2011 Conference “Cuba Today: The Gains & Challenges”. These 4 notable events which debated and discussed the importance of the Cuban revolution and the Cuba solidarity movement
worldwide from the point of view of activists and revolutionaries were the only of their kind in Canada. We are pleased that in the last four years we have brought out more than 1,700 people, 35 speakers, and 35 different subjects surrounding the Cuban revolution and its internal and external dynamics.
The 2012 conference will expand on the previous 4 years, with the theme of “Cuba’s Economic Reforms: Capitalism or Socialism”. We will be welcoming many important guests, including our honoured guest for the third year in a row, Dr.
Aleida Guevara, Cuban Leader, Prominent Author and Daughter of Legendary Revolutionary Ernesto Che Guevara. We hope to see you at the 5th annual Canada International
Che Guevara Conference.

 

 

The New Way of War Workshop – October 20, 2012

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

Thank you Steve Niva & Tim Russell

Steve Niva, Tim Russell- professors, on the New way of War

Austin’s Picks: Pre-figurative Politics? from Kloncke

Tuesday, October 23rd, 2012

I have been thinking about dual power, working for the political change that I want as one means of seizing power and living the daily politics of the world that I dream about as the second means of demonstrating the power of a different political vision.  Austin sent along a posting from Katie Loncke from March 2011 that is thinking on similar lines.  I like the term that Kloncke uses, pre-figurative politics, to identify the immediate implementation of a political system.

Here is the piece from Kloncke.  If you want to know more about her ideas, jump to her website.

 

Revolutionary and Pre-Figurative Politics

Katie Loncke MARCH 17, 2011

How do the two fit together?

This question’s been yelling itself in my face for the past couple of days. (Weeks?) Not only in theoretical terms, but in practical ways. Touched on by elders, peers, friends, strangers.

Roughly (and this is my own attempt, for which I’ll accept blame but not credit):

Some groups are great at building and exemplifying models of anti-oppressive ways of being. (Pre-figurative politics, as I understand it, means practicing now the kind of society you want to build in the future.) Enacting horizontal group dynamics, confronting white supremacist and racist behavior, challenging and transforming sexism, homophobia, transphobia, fatphobia, ableism, etc. in myriad ways, and continually developing sophisticated, intersectional analyses of these lived oppressions. Honoring and valuing healing; promoting literacy around dealing with trauma and mental wellness. Developing healthy sex-positive cultures grounded in consent. Practicing conscientious methods for dealing with intimate violence and abuse. Giving and receiving criticism with humility, generosity, bravery, and kindness. Doing very practical things like organizing childcare collectives, artmaking groups, and food distribution programs; infusing them with liberatory values. Transforming estranged relationship with our bodies, the earth, and nature. Theorizing these and more practices, and sharing them.

At the same time, some groups are great at developing people’s revolutionary class consciousness. Examining the material processes of history with an eye toward figuring out the best ways to intervene in those historical processes, and change things for the better. Get rid of classes altogether. Put an end to imperialism. Employ practice and theory, in current conditions, to avoid the pitfall of reformism and move militantly and decisively toward a world of “freely associating producers” — a world where violent compulsion is no longer ambient, as it is under capitalism and has been under all forms of class society (to stake a claim against what I learned about Foucault, in college). I’m impressed and inspired by groups that maintain a keen focus on this goal, and whose work reflects the urgency of building the class power necessary for exploited people to liberate themselves/ourselves from the yoke (and rod) of capital.

Now. Is there overlap between these ‘types’ of groups?

Yes.

A lot?

In the Bay Area? In the US?

IIIIIIII dunno. What do you think? What are you finding?

That’s all for now; more questions than answers.

October 24, 2012 Olympia Movement for Justice & Peace (OMJP) Meeting

Monday, October 22nd, 2012

when: Wednesday, OCTOBER 24 AT 7PM
where: POWER OFFICE 309 5TH AVE.,(behind Rainy Day Records & 1/2 blcok from Capitol Theatre)

OMJP Meets the 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of each month.
This October 24th Meeting  immediately follows the  Peoples’ Movement Assembly that was held at The Evergreen State College  October 19-20.
We will evaluate what worked well and what can be improved.
We can also evaluate where we are going in the future and upcoming events.
Hope you can attend
Maybe we are the ones we have been waiting for…
Olympia Movement for Justice & Peace
Email List http://lists.riseup.net/www/info/olympiansforpeace

 

Subscribe to RSS feed